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Sessions

The Program of the Millennium Development goals

Organizers:

Al Farabi Kazakh National University 

Relevance:

In accordance with the right of everyone to a decent quality of life and responsibility of the state for high quality life , which is obliged to help people out of extreme poverty by providing them with the first necessities : high-calorie food, clothing, clean water, shelter and medical care.  

Goals:

To ensure the right to a decent life for every human being, to maintain stability of the world order and development of a global sustainable growth. 

Key issues:

Government policy on development, human rights, education, health and science. Concept of sustainable growth. Programs on reduction of the rate of land degradation, water management, biodiversity conservation, increased agricultural productivit. Mechanisms of transferring to new technologies. The advanced practices to attract investments and building the infrastructure (electricity, water, transport systems, roads and schools). Perspectives of strengthening the role of NGOs, national youth councils, business discussion and realization Strategy and plans to combat poverty and anti-corruption projects after 2015. 

In accordance with the right of everyone to a decent quality of life and responsibility of the state for high quality life , which is obliged to help people out of extreme poverty by providing them with the first necessities : high-calorie food, clothing, clean water, shelter and medical care. Today   more than 238 million of young people live on less than a dollar a day .The extreme  poverty of  population leads to an increase in the number of children who drop  school and become homeless or go to work. Most Asian and North African countries have already embarked on the path of the eradication  of poverty, but in many African countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, almost there is no progress in this direction. Moreover, in Western Asia, the scale of  poverty has  increased.

 

 

Timeline

12.05.2015 12:32:12
The United Nations Non-Governmental Liaison Service (UN-NGLS) launched a consultation on 31 May 2013 to gather critical analysis from civil society on the UN post-2015 development agenda. This initiative was conducted in partnership with the Post-2015 Development Planning Team of the Executive Office of the Secretary-General, and with support from the UN Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the Ford Foundation. The findings of the consultation, which will be delivered in two parts, serve as official input to the UN intergovernmental process for defining the post-2015 development agenda.
12.05.2015 12:34:19
Civil society networks and social movements from every world region have provided remarkably similar accounts of economic, social and environmental crises, including extreme inequalities, extensive human rights violations, and rampant natural resource exploitations that are overwhelming the world’s ecosystems. The case for radical transformation is irrefutable. Within this G-Global discussion, civil society analysts identify what is causing these problems, and share evidence-based solutions. It is clear that the obstacles to achieving sustainable development are not technical; they are political. The United Nations post-2015 development discussions provide a timely opportunity to mobilize leadership and support for fundamental change to ensure justice, equality, equity, and sustainability.
12.05.2015 13:46:53
The recommendations received from regional civil society networks via this consultation convey strategies for achieving development and sustainability in tandem. The analysis has been organized according to four main objectives that surfaced from the inputs received: Rebalance power relations for justice Fulfill human rights and overcome exclusion Ensure equitable distribution and safe use of natural resources Establish participatory governance, accountability and transparency
12.05.2015 17:43:16
Contributors raised fundamental concerns around power relations in a variety of contexts, identifying that imbalances of power have eroded justice and integrity in societies across all regions of the world. All of the economic, social, environmental and governance objectives discussed by civil society networks relate to rebalancing power in some sense, as well as to addressing historic and ongoing injustices. Civil society networks most fervently underscored the need to rebalance power relations for justice in terms of transforming economies – in particular, to re-orient economic governance and policies at all levels toward the fulfillment of human rights and the multiple dimensions of human well-being.
12.05.2015 20:45:03
Civil society networks identified that blanket policy prescriptions, such as indiscriminate financial and trade liberalization, deregulation and privatization, export- and foreign investment-led growth, and a reduced role of the State, have led to tremendous concentration of wealth and power, exacerbated inequalities, and increased poverty. A truly transformative post-2015 development agenda must therefore promote the diversification of national economies towards more localized, employment-intensive forms of production and consumption, and away from resource-intensive means. The agenda must also embed strong redistributive and inclusive policies, including universal access to essential public services and a reversal of the widespread pattern of stagnating or declining wages and incomes affecting the majority of the world’s population. The regional networks presented a wealth of successful experiences to align economic activities with the imperatives of decent employment and environmental regeneration.
13.05.2015 05:19:21
However, many obstacles and systemic risks inherent to the current international trade, investment and financial architecture stand in the way of implementing this transformative agenda and must be overcome. Participants also emphasized the need for demilitarization and the redirection of significant amounts of military funding to sustainable development programmes. Participants firmly asserted that the post-2015 development agenda must adopt a human rights-based approach to ensure that policies benefit the most vulnerable and marginalized people, and foster equity and equality.
13.05.2015 10:51:52
The post-2015 agenda must call on UN Member States to fulfill human rights and overcome exclusion, including by taking steps to the maximum of available resources to progressively achieve the full realization of rights, and by respecting the principle of non-regression. Civil society networks urged for a strengthened role of the State in respecting, protecting and fulfilling the full gamut of economic, social, cultural, civil and political rights for all people. Contributors proposed approaches to ensure that the rights to education, universal health care (including sexual and reproductive health), decent work, and social protection are fulfilled, and that the rights of marginalized groups including women, Indigenous peoples, persons with disabilities, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people, ethnic groups and migrants are no longer violated.
13.05.2015 13:57:08
In numerous countries, the extractive, energy and agriculture industries are committing widespread human rights violations, particularly through land and water grabs, but also through civil and political rights violations. The exploitative practices of these industries have caused a significant amount of environmental and social stress, and have been responsible for extensive and disproportionate harm to Indigenous peoples. The Convention on Biological Diversity warns that human impacts, such as pollution and deforestation, risk pushing ecosystems past tipping points. Climate change is an urgent global environmental challenge that threatens to severely undermine development efforts.
13.05.2015 15:54:44
Civil society networks insisted that the post-2015 development agenda must promote policies to ensure equitable distribution and safe use of natural resources. Such policies must move beyond pursuing resource efficiency to asserting resource sufficiency, participants argued, adding that constraints imposed by environmental limitations make discussions about redistribution and fair shares in terms of natural resources unavoidable. Civil society networks recommended several models for sustainable consumption and production, including the circular economy, the social and solidarity economy, the sharing economy, and biomimicry. It follows that transformation of the energy industry is essential, and all nations must aggressively shift away from the use of fossil fuels and nuclear energy – which both carry tremendous economic, environmental and social liabilities – and advance toward truly clean, renewable, and equitably distributed power generation. Harmful subsides to dangerous energy industries must be eliminated and re-directed to renewable energy and other sustainable development priorities.
13.05.2015 23:11:55
To achieve sustainable agriculture, small-holder farmers, who feed a majority of the world’s people, must be supported through the model of food sovereignty. Organic and agro-ecological practices must be promoted, and staple food production should be oriented to serve local consumption needs before export markets. A powerful call for climate justice was issued from participants in Africa, who maintained that the scale of climate finance is insufficient to meet necessary levels of action, and that although adaptation finance is the priority for Africa, the significant majority of available funding is for mitigation. Developed countries must live up to their commitments to provide new and additional, adequate and predictable financing to developing countries, free of any harmful conditionalities, in accordance with the principles of common but differentiated responsibilities and polluter pays
14.05.2015 03:32:50
As failure to deliver on commitments is a pervasive problem in sustainable development, the post-2015 development agenda must establish participatory governance, accountability and transparency, which are compelled by internationally agreed human rights, including the rights to participate in public affairs, access to information, and access to justice and administration. The post-2015 agenda should employ human rights accountability mechanisms, such as the Universal Periodic Review of the Human Rights Council, and seek to strengthen them. Accountability in the post-2015 agenda will remain meaningless if strong means of implementation are not established. The private sector cannot be expected to play a leading role in managing the major structural shifts required to realize development goals equitably and sustainably. Democratically defined public policies must steer public and private initiatives to meet sustainable development objectives
14.05.2015 16:15:53
Participants identified that a substantial amount of global policy-making is occurring in unaccountable groupings such as the G8 and G20, and that the post-2015 development agenda should direct States to reconceptualize and democratize the global policy architecture, especially in the areas of trade, finance and macroeconomic policy. Participants called on the UN to subject the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund to oversight, and support regional efforts toward self-defined development. The policies and programmes of international financial institutions should be made compatible with the extra-territorial human rights obligations of Member States, defined in the Maastricht Principles on Extraterritorial Obligations in the area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.
14.05.2015 21:06:15
The post-2015 agenda itself must be defined, implemented and monitored through fully participatory processes in which all voices are heard. Civil society contributors emphasized that the onus is on decisionmakers to build the capacity of people to participate. People affected by policies should not be considered followers of a debate; they should be empowered to help lead agendas, and ensure accountability for commitments. Monitoring processes must incorporate qualitative measures of progress, such as the Gross National Happiness Index developed by the Kingdom of Bhutan, or Genuine Progress Indicators, and data must be disaggregated by gender, age, geographical location, rural/urban location, income, educational background and other relevant indicators. It is critical to approach development holistically, and evaluate it comprehensively, to ensure that efforts are continually advancing justice, equality, equity, and sustainability.
14.05.2015 23:24:56
According to civil society networks from all of the regions, the goals included in the post-2015 development framework must be truly universal and comprehensive, encompassing the changes that must take place in all countries. The post-2015 agenda must focus not only on goals, but also on structural and root causes of rising inequality, impoverishment, social exclusion, environmental degradation and conflict. It must address the barriers to meaningful structural transformation and incorporate strong means of implementation and accountability mechanisms. Contributors emphasized that the post-2015 agenda must also address issues of peace and excessive militarization, as there cannot be development without peace. States must move toward sustainable production and consumption patterns and establish global economic policy coherence.
15.05.2015 06:10:55
The post-2015 agenda must avoid a “homogenizing view” of development (focused on “modern, urban and global” societies) and embrace diverse paradigms such as the Indigenous concept of “buen vivir,” which is beginning to guide development strategies in parts of Latin America. It should promote concrete strategies that transform economic relations at the local level, such as the worldwide social and solidarity economy movement, and incorporate more holistic mechanisms to monitor progress, such as the Gross National Happiness Index of the Kingdom of Bhutan.
15.05.2015 09:24:38
Rising inequalities, repeated financial crises, and warnings that ecosystems are approaching tipping points compel urgent and fundamental restructuring of economies worldwide. This cannot amount to doing “business as usual” in a more eco-friendly way. The post-2015 discussions should be a space to rethink the prevailing economic development paradigm, and to move beyond blanket prescriptions, such as indiscriminate promotion of financial and trade liberalization, deregulation and privatization, export- and foreign investmentled growth, and a reduced role of the State. The post-2015 agenda must instead embrace State leadership of the transition under strong democratic oversight, in accordance with the concept of a “democratic developmental State.” In many developing countries, high growth rates fuelled by the recent commodity boom did not translate into job creation and expansion of social services.
15.05.2015 13:57:25
Although “rents” from extractive industries and primary commodity exports did lead to substantial redistributive policies in some countries (as in parts of Latin America), these sectors inflicted environmental and social costs, including extensive human rights violations. Growth is a highly misleading proxy for job creation and should not be an aim in itself; the objective should be the realization of all human rights and all aspects of human wellbeing. The private sector, absent a framework of policies and rules that steer investments towards nationally defined sustainable development priorities, will not lead development in that direction. A truly transformative post-2015 development agenda must promote the diversification of national economies towards more localized, employment-intensive forms of production and consumption, and away from resource-intensive means.
15.05.2015 16:50:21
1. Reform the Trade and Investment Architecture a) Review international trade and investment agreements, which restrict the ability of governments to regulate foreign investments in the public interest, impose barriers to technology transfer, prevent fair taxation, and include other measures not consistent with the objectives of sustainable development; b) Address the problem of excessive concentration of corporate power, such as global cartels that stifle innovation and crowd out alternative initiatives, notably by reinstating the equivalent of the former UN Centre on Transnational Corporations as an independent entity to monitor transnational corporations (TNCs) and help ensure that States respect their commitments to regulate them; c) Ensure that the trade architecture provides the flexibility for developing countries to adapt trade policies to protect the livelihoods of small producers and foster nascent domestic industries, including by ensuring the full participation of all Member States in the multilateral trading system, and giving Special and Differential Treatment (SDT) serious weight, operationalization, and legal status for developing countries in the next phase of negotiations at the World Trade Organization (WTO).
15.05.2015 17:10:58
And for many people to follow the principles is more important than profit. "Faith interfere cynically make a popular spiritual literature today. Inside the church there are a lot of questions, clear answers that the church itself can not give (or not), and personal moral principles do not allow to make money. For example: how the saints pray in different needs. It is demanded by the people literature.
15.05.2015 17:29:36
And for many people to follow the principles is more important than profit. "Faith interfere cynically make a popular spiritual literature today. Inside the church there are a lot of questions, clear answers that the church itself can not give (or not), and personal moral principles do not allow to make money. For example: how the saints pray in different needs. It is demanded by the people literature.
15.05.2015 19:52:18
2. Reform Development Finance and the International Financial Architecture a) Refrain from treating foreign direct investment (FDI) as a substitute for overseas development assistance (ODA); the long standing commitment of developed countries to dedicate 0.7% of gross domestic income to ODA should be met, while a new rights based approach of financial transfers beyond ODA should be implemented in the form of a mandatory system, a fiscal equalization scheme, or a compensation scheme, to pay off climate debt and other forms of ecological debt; b) Address the problem of unsustainable debt, including by: i) reviewing onerous debts and cancelling illegitimate debt; ii) prioritizing resources for meeting the development goals over debt repayments, especially in least developed countries; iii) establishing an independent and fair debt arbitration court that can provide a single statutory framework for debt crisis resolution by ensuring that both creditors and debtors cooperate to restructure sovereign debt, with respect to a country’s unique economic conditions;
16.05.2015 01:24:17
Reform the international financial architecture; reign in the power of “too big to fail” institutions through enforceable national and international regulations that would sanction them as “too big to allow,” and implement a range of measures to prevent the socialization of the costs of corporate malpractices; increase financial regulation and reverse the financialization of the economy in a manner that would allow for a sustained shift of resources from the financial economy back to the real economy;
16.05.2015 05:55:29
Reform and democratize international financial institutions to ensure that they: i) give much greater voice to developing countries, particularly Least Developed Countries; ii) genuinely respond to national and regional circumstances and priorities; iii) catalyze productive investment; and iv) abide by the international human rights obligations of States; e) Promote new financial and monetary architectures at the regional level, by: i) establishing regional monetary funds that would pool foreign currency reserves to combat speculative attacks and to compensate for economic asymmetries within the region; ii) extending intra-regional trade through regional complementary currencies; and iii) establishing or consolidating regional development banks that are oriented to finance transformative objectives and are aligned with the realization of economic, social and cultural rights and environmental regeneration;
16.05.2015 15:33:09
Implement a financial transactions tax regionally and at the global level; g) Agree internationally to automatic exchange of information of bank holdings, country by-country reporting of TNCs, and the closing of tax havens, as indispensable measures to prevent tax avoidances and enable progressive redistributive taxes; h) Adopt regional agreements to reverse the “race to the bottom” in national tax concessions to foreign corporations
16.05.2015 17:53:20
3. Promote National Redistributive Measures a) Implement progressive taxation measures on wealthier companies and individuals and reverse regressive tax measures, such as high value-added tax (VAT), especially on essential products; b) Phase out subsidies that support unsustainable production and consumption patterns and redirect these large amounts of resources to fund sustainable development, while ensuring that poorer income groups are not negatively affected by these measures; c) Adopt targets to shift government resources away from military spending and towards social spending; d) Reduce wage gaps by introducing or increasing the minimum wage and introducing caps on higher incomes;
17.05.2015 01:22:43
Promote universal access to social services and promote redistributive policies such as cash transfers, while refraining from imposing socially-oriented conditionalities when these may, in practice, negatively impact on the unpaid care work of women; f) Adopt goals and targets to frame these redistributive policies and combat excessive concentrations of wealth and land ownership, such as a universal objective on “maximum limits on wealth per person or enterprise”: for example, less than x% of the persons or enterprises cannot own more than y% of GDP
17.05.2015 11:20:32
4. Democratize Politics and the Media a) Adopt policies that would favour the democratization of the media and counter the concentration of media ownership; b) Democratize political parties and the financing of electoral campaigns with specific targets: for example, 80% of political party campaigns must come from a common public pool, and only 20% from the private sector or individuals.
17.05.2015 16:04:52
5. Scale up the Social and Solidarity Economy a) Support the scaling-up of the social and solidarity economy (SSE), which represents myriad initiatives around the world by enterprises, cooperatives, organizations and community groups that undertake economic activities that create decent jobs, but at the same time seek to meet social and/or environmental objectives, following shared principles such as cooperation, democratic economic management and local ownership and reinvestments. Create a conducive environment for SSE through the creation of SSE appropriate legislative and legal frameworks, providing low-cost capital, and funding for development assistance in this field.
17.05.2015 23:35:30
To ensure a just, equitable and sustainable world in which all people experience individual and collective wellbeing, the post-2015 development agenda must be fully aligned with the existing human rights framework, reflecting its fundamental principles of universality, equality and non-discrimination, as well as progressive realization and non-regression. Human rights are indivisible, interrelated and interdependent. Economic, social, cultural, civil and political rights must be fully realized for all; it is critical to focus support for fulfilling the rights of vulnerable and marginalized people, particularly those who face intersecting inequalities based on gender, age, class, ethnicity, indigeneity, sexual orientation, gender identity, (dis)abilities, and/or status as a migrant, asylum-seeker or refugee, many of whom have been systematically, historically and continually excluded. It is essential to ensure policy coherence between the post-2015 negotiations and existing international human rights agreements. Human rights are not moral aspirations; they are internationally agreed legal obligations.
18.05.2015 13:13:27
The human rights framework can provide clarity on the obligations of States regarding the outcomes of the post-2015 process. A human rights-based approach is essential to overcome growing inequalities, discriminatory practices, and unjust distributions of power that impede development progress. The new development agenda must prioritize measures to realize equality and equity, and accordingly must enable full and meaningful participation of all stakeholders – most particularly marginalized and disenfranchised groups – throughout all phases of policy-making, budgeting, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The human rights framework also includes robust accountability mechanisms (discussed further in the sections on Participatory Governance, Accountability and Transparency where recommendations concerning progressive realization and non-regression, full ratification, human rights-based corporate accountability, and the extra-territorial obligations of States are presented).
18.05.2015 17:02:11
The post-2015 agenda must effectively address the numerous challenges that continue to prevent the fulfillment of human rights for many, and must reinforce the duty of States to use the maximum of their available resources to realize these rights progressively for all. Addressing these challenges will require Member States to agree to: 1. Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Promote Decent Work and Social Protection for All a) Put into practice the application of the Guiding Principles on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights when formulating and implementing poverty eradication measures and other policies; b) Agree to a new goal on full and decent employment and livelihoods, incorporating the four pillars of the International Labour Organization (ILO)’s Decent Work Agenda; c) Agree to a stand-alone goal on universal social protection in the post-2015 agenda, emphasizing the need to introduce social protection floors in countries where social security is minimal, but with the aim to secure universal access to social services and basic income security for all, based on ILO Recommendation 202;.
18.05.2015 21:20:24
2. Address Growing Inequalities as an Obstacle to the Fulfillment of Human Rights for All a) Adopt a stand-alone goal on reversing growing inequalities; and include inequality reduction targets in all other goals. 3. Address Cross-cutting Issues on the Right to Health, Including Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights a) Complete “the unfinished business of the unmet MDGs”: reaffirm the fight against HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, while adapting to new health challenges and addressing non-communicable diseases; b) Ensure that targets related to universal access to primary healthcare are defined to include not only basic services but all necessary services, while explicity calling for quality healthcare services; c) Assure the right to quality health care for girls and women, including sexual and reproductive health and rights, e.g., access to all the methods available to control fertility, to safe and adequate maternity care, and to prevention and treatment options for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections; women and girls must also be free to decide on all matters of their sexuality, free from coercion, discrimination and violence;
19.05.2015 07:21:36
d) Include targets on the social determinants of health, including gender equality, access to education, water and sanitation, as well as State-provided incentives for healthy behaviour; e) Address the inter-linkages between health and inequality, and between ill-health and its impact on all other aspects of development, such as employment and education. 4. Develop a Comprehensive Agenda for Fulfilling the Right to Education a) Make explicit the obligation of States towards free education, at least in compulsory stages and progressively beyond, as stated in General Comment #13 on “The right to education” of the UN Committee on Economic, Cultural and Social Rights; b) Conceptualize education as central to structural transformation in countries with weak productive capacities, to achieve a shift from low to a high skilled workforce;
19.05.2015 07:22:49
Chinese investors change their priorities to improve competitiveness in the international arena as well as in response to changes in the behavior of local consumers. Against the background of this trend, the geography of Chinese investment has expanded considerably. Today it already includes the developed countries of Europe and America and is not limited to Asian, African and Latin American countries with significant natural resources.
19.05.2015 11:40:26
4. Develop a Comprehensive Agenda for Fulfilling the Right to Education a) Make explicit the obligation of States towards free education, at least in compulsory stages and progressively beyond, as stated in General Comment #13 on “The right to education” of the UN Committee on Economic, Cultural and Social Rights; b) Conceptualize education as central to structural transformation in countries with weak productive capacities, to achieve a shift from low to a high skilled workforce; c) Ensure that the education agenda does not get reduced to responding to questions of “employability,” but encompasses the development of life skills essential to participate meaningfully in economic, social and political activities, and the acquisition of adequate knowledge to respect and appreciate the value of human rights, gender sensitivity, social justice, community cooperation and multi-culturalism; d) Include targets for adequate remuneration and benefits for teachers, as well as good working conditions; e) Acknowledge and support the role of popular and traditional knowledge as a valid source of knowledge alongside formal academic science
19.05.2015 11:41:38
In addition, Chinese companies have been quick to take advantage of the slow pace of economic recovery in developed countries after the 2008 financial crisis that affected the value of their assets. In recent years, Chinese investment in developed countries is much higher than the volume of investments in emerging markets. In 2014, Chinese investment in the US grew by 23.9% and in the EU - 70%, far exceeding the growth rate of the total outward FDI worldwide during this period (14.1%)
19.05.2015 14:20:04
5. Respect, Protect and Promote the Rights of Indigenous Peoples a) Implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which outlines the minimal standards of development that Indigenous peoples have requested; promote, protect and respect the human and collective rights of Indigenous peoples, including through enforcement of their rights to their land, territories and resources, to self-determination, and to free prior and informed consent; b) Establish, within the Special Procedures of Human Rights Council, a Special Rapporteur on extractive industries and human rights in order to address human rights abuses in the extractive sector, especially in Indigenous territories.
19.05.2015 17:33:17
6. Protect and Promote Women’s Human Rights and Gender Equality a) Integrate gender equality and women’s empowerment not only as a stand-alone goal, but also across all goals and the full post-2015 development agenda, including targets to overcome women’s unequal access to economic livelihood opportunities and formal employment; b) Incorporate zero tolerance targets for violence against women and girls in recognition of their human rights to live free of violence. c) Ensure the full and equal participation of women in all public and private decision making; d) Address the unpaid contributions to development made by women at all levels, including by recognizing care work as critical to survival of the economy and society, and reinforcing State responsibilities to invest in social services including child care, elder care, and healthcare.
19.05.2015 23:30:14
8. Overcome Discrimination Based on Ethnicity a) Eliminate structural discrimination based on caste and ethnicity and address its intersection with poverty; b) Ensure access to justice for all ethnic groups; c) Establish monitoring processes to help ensure that different ethnic groups are fairly represented in the different spheres of government and the State in order to foster stability.
20.05.2015 06:39:10
9. Mainstream the Rights of Persons with Disabilities a) Mainstream the rights of people living with disabilities, building on the normative framework that the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities provides to support the one billion individuals experiencing disability, with attendant impact on health, educational achievement, economic opportunities and poverty. 10. Empower Youth a) Recognize that it is through young people that societies are transformed; the challenges they face such as mass unemployment are of the present and not only “the future,” and thus youth should be fully included in the design and implementation of the post-2015 agenda; b) End the tendency to marginalize youth development challenges, including by establishing a UN entity dedicated to mainstreaming youth issues across the development agenda, along the lines of UN Women.
20.05.2015 12:26:07
Evidence abounds that human activity is severely damaging the ecosystems that support life through increasingly unsustainable and inequitable exploitation of natural resources, particularly by the extractive, energy and agro-industrial sectors. Large scale agriculture is a significant cause of environmental stress, and large agri-business has been responsible for extensive human rights violations, particularly with regard to land and water grabbing. In numerous countries, extractive industries are displacing millions of people and destroying land, water and sacred sites, disproportionately affecting Indigenous peoples. In the face of accelerated climate change – including devastating environmental damage and economic loss – the extraction and use of fossil fuels must be dramatically reduced. The transition away from fossil fuels must not lead to increased use of other hazardous sources of energy, such as nuclear power – often misleadingly positioned as a clean source. Poor and marginalized communities are most at risk, and most severely harmed, by these activities and climate change impacts.
20.05.2015 12:28:03
Evidence abounds that human activity is severely damaging the ecosystems that support life through increasingly unsustainable and inequitable exploitation of natural resources, particularly by the extractive, energy and agro-industrial sectors. Large scale agriculture is a significant cause of environmental stress, and large agri-business has been responsible for extensive human rights violations, particularly with regard to land and water grabbing. In numerous countries, extractive industries are displacing millions of people and destroying land, water and sacred sites, disproportionately affecting Indigenous peoples. In the face of accelerated climate change – including devastating environmental damage and economic loss – the extraction and use of fossil fuels must be dramatically reduced. The transition away from fossil fuels must not lead to increased use of other hazardous sources of energy, such as nuclear power – often misleadingly positioned as a clean source. Poor and marginalized communities are most at risk, and most severely harmed, by these activities and climate change impacts.
20.05.2015 15:56:52
A paradigm shift must occur in the practices of the agricultural, extractive, and energy sectors, as well as in consumption and production patterns more generally. Comprehensive global-to-local strategies are essential to enable this shift, along with increased respect for natural systems and much more conscious and sustainable use of their resources. Civil society networks suggested founding natural resource management on protecting the “commons.” Water, public land, energy, air, forests, and biodiversity must not be privatized or commodified.
20.05.2015 19:29:22
A post-2015 agenda, grounded in principles of justice, equality, equity and sustainability, must address global environmental challenges, and seek to restore rebalance. Member States should agree to: 1. Protect the Global Commons a) Adopt measures to protect the global commons to ensure natural resources are not over-consumed, such as common-pool resource management, in which a community or village democratically manages its local resources, ensuring sustainability, as well as equitable use and distribution of benefits. b) Promote the ecosystems approach – the primary framework for action under the Convention on Biological Diversity – and territorial management planning, in which communities map their resources, consider sustainable-use studies, and develop plans to holistically manage the physical, social, political, and spiritual dimensions of a territory.
21.05.2015 17:01:23
2. Ensure Food Sovereignty a) Adopt the concept of food sovereignty to guide national and international policies affecting food systems; b) Prioritize agrarian reform and adopt measures that would include: land redistribution, including to landless farmers; strengthening land tenure rights and rights of small farmers to work the land; ensuring pastoralists’ rights to communal land; and protection against land grabs;
21.05.2015 18:58:53
Adopt economic support measures to build the productive capacities of small-holder farmers and Indigenous peoples to ensure they are able to produce staple crops independently, and maintain food sovereignty; d) Enact a range of measures to support food sovereignty, including: i) public procurement policies that favour the purchase of food for public schools from small scale and family farms; ii) investments and capacity-building for local food production through organic and agro-ecological methods (which also increase yield, as outlined in FAO’s Organic Agriculture Programme); iii) support to “mutual help” networks that make essential foodstuffs available at low prices in poor marginalized areas; e) Adopt the UN Food and Agriculture Organization Right to Food Guidelines and strengthen the FAO Committee on World Food Security Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests in the Context of National Food Security, by reconfiguring them toward enforceable multilateral agreements, including on responsible agricultural investment.
22.05.2015 14:50:39
3. Regulate and Transform the Extractive and Energy Industries; Assess New Technologies a) Eradicate subsidies to the fossil fuel and nuclear industries; end subsidies to carbon emitting transnational corporations; adopt/enforce the “polluter pays” principle through quantifiable goals and measures; b) Promote carbon-free sources of energy, including the expansion of solar energy and small-scale hydropower; aggressively phase out fossil fuel and nuclear energy, which both carry substantial financial, environmental and social liabilities; c) Act upon a number of urgent recommendations regarding the ongoing Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster from internationally renowned nuclear scientists and civil society analysts to ensure the protection of public health and safety both in Japan and globally, including that Japan must work with international organizations to put a worldwide engineering group in charge of resolving the situation;
22.05.2015 19:51:57
d) Establish an independent technology assessment mechanism to assess the ecological and health impact of new technologies at international, regional and national levels; e) Adopt the principles and standards of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative to promote revenue transparency and accountability in the extractive sector; f) Respect, protect and fulfill the full gamut of the rights of Indigenous peoples, who are disproportionately harmed by energy and extractive industry practices including land grabs, pollution, and destruction of sacred sites; g) Reduce production and consumption in order to achieve sustainable consumption through systems of incentives and disincentives, including social and legal means such as reducing packaging, developing guidelines for prolonging the life span of manufactured products, and sanctions against companies that engage in the “programmed obsolescence” of their products; implement the 10 Year Framework Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP), with enhanced involvement of civil society.
23.05.2015 13:10:18
4. Urgently Take Aggressive Action to Address Climate Change a) Recognize the historical responsibilities of industrialized countries to take the lead in emissions reduction, and provide the necessary resources and technology transfers for developing countries to make the transition to a low-carbon economy; b) Include the principles of “common but differentiated responsibilities” and “polluter pays” (both recently reaffirmed during the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development) in the post-2015 agenda, and translate them into quantifiable goals; c) Conclude a fair, ambitious and binding international climate change agreement, which should: ensure that the parameters for reducing greenhouse gas emissions follow the ecological limits and timelines defined by science; focus on non-market mechanisms to address climate change; and ensure that developed countries provide the required funds and technology to developing countries; d) Provide much greater levels of climate finance, ensuring that it is balanced between mitigation and climate adaptation; e) Ensure climate finance is derived from stable and predictable public sources in climate debtor countries, is new and additional to existing ODA commitments, and is free of conditionalities, particularly those that might restrict Indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ involvement in decision-making and the design and implementation of related activities.
23.05.2015 13:12:03
In August 2011, Bright Food has acquired 75% of Manassen Foods. As a result of this transaction Bright Food and Manassen Foods began to work together in areas such as the promotion and development of the brand, the launch of new products of middle and high price segment, the selection of suppliers of raw materials search and replication of successful business models. This interaction has allowed them to achieve high results.

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