Международный секретариат G-Global г.Астана, ул.Темирказык, 65, офис 116 тел.: 7(7172) 278903

Momynkul N.M. – student of the group 129-18

Scientific Director: Muratova M. A., master of Pedagogical sciences

South Kazakhstan State Pedagogical University, Shymkent

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This article give an useful information about including computer games in learning English language. There are some important advices for foreign language learners.

The computer is one of the modern learning tools with unique capabilities. Combining the capabilities of a TV, VCR, books, a calculator, being a universal toy that can imitate any toys and games. In our time, familiarity with the computer occurs at a very early age. I chose this research topic because I was interested in how computer games affect the learning of English. In my opinion, the theme chosen by me is important and relevant, since most of the guys spend a lot of time playing computer games. computer games are becoming more and more popular among students in grades 5-6 in studying English. Computer games have a positive effect on learning English, expand the vocabulary of players, improve their hearing and pronunciation skills and arouse interest in learning it. The percentage of the content of English in the originals is 100%, it should be noted that not many people play the originals of really difficult games with a deep plot and a huge number of dialogues. But everyone can understand, for example, in Need for speed, just armed with a dictionary or an online translator just for the first couple of times.

In the course of the study, we came across such a term as “language localization”. Language localization (from an armor. Locus - a place) is a translation and cultural adaptation of a product to features of the certain country, region or group of the population. Moreover, the "product" means any product or service. Localization is the second phase in the framework of the overall process of internationalization and localization. It also provides a comprehensive study of the target culture, necessary for the correct adaptation of the product to the needs of individual markets. And, of course, the positive effect of computer games is achievable only if the time behind them does not exceed 2-3 hours per day. A drunken game, when they forget about everything and play until 10 o'clock every day does not lead to anything good, because forgetting about homework, exercise and proper nutrition can deplete the body, get gaps in knowledge and emotional breakdown.Game-based and game-enhanced language learning. Motivation is an important, pervasive behavior determinant (Schunk, Meece, & Pintrich, 2013) of students, teachers and administrators (Elliot & Covington, 2001). Research has shown that motivation affects human behavior in the “choice of a particular action, the persistence with it and the effort expended on it” (Dörnyei, Csizér, & Németh, 2006, p. 9). Language Learning Motivation (LLM) theories have undergone dramatic changes since first introduced. Dörnyei and Ushioda (2011) have categorized them into three phases: the social psychological period (1959-1990), the cognitive-situated period (1990s), and the processoriented period (turn of the 20th century). The first phase highlights the importance of language learners’ attitudes toward the target language and language community. It includes several factors such as interest in foreign countries, instrumental motivation, and anxiety, to name just a few. The second phase coordinates motivation research with the cognitive revolution in psychology focusing on situated analysis of motivation (e.g., in the classroom). The third phase conceptualizes motivation as a process occurring over time. These two approaches, however, are criticized mainly on two fronts. Firstly, motivation is considered here as a linear phenomenon while it seems to be the result of a series of complex interactions. Secondly, theories presented during these two phases follow a reductionist approach toward motivation by defining a set of variables as significant contributors to motivation. As recently proposed, the socio-dynamic phase seeks to remedy these criticisms. It considers “the situated complexity of the L2 motivation process and its organic development in dynamic interaction with a multiplicity of internal, social and contextual factors” and aims at taking “account of the broader complexities of language learning and use in the modern globalised world” (Dörnyei & Ushioda, 2011, p. 72). For example, it is understood after Vygotsky (1978) that individuals have an active participatory role in construction of motivational goals and also in what they internalize as a result (Dörnyei & Ushioda, 2011). Therefore, while the context shapes an individual’s level of motivation, it is itself formed by standards of the individual(s) participating to define it. A study by Connolly, Stansfield, and Hainey (2011) evaluated the effects of an alternate reality game on motivation of secondary school students for learning modern foreign languages across different European countries. Ninety-five language teachers and 328 students from 17 countries participated in the study. Students played the DVG at home or in the classroom for 10 days. Data collection involved a pre-test-post-test design (online administration). Results showed that the DVG raised the students’ motivation and participants believed that the DVG provided them with skills regarding cooperation, collaboration, and teamwork. The DVG also offered opportunities for engagement with peers from different language backgrounds across different countries. The study concluded that gaming helps motivate students for second language learning and can be used as a means to move beyond the constraints of traditional classrooms.

Motivation is a determining factor in successful second/foreign language learning since it provides the initial will and the driving force to stand the effortful process of learning another language (Dörnyei, 1994, 1998). Findings of the research on motivational effects of gamebased learning are very limited (Girard, Ecalle, & Magnant, 2013; Tsai & Fan, 2013), and there is a lack of sufficient empirical evidence to encourage or discourage their use as educational instruments (Connolly, Boyle, MacArthur, Hainey, & Boyle, 2012). Additionally, Cole and Vanderplank (2016) conclude that a most important need in investigating informal educational instruments is how they work when implemented in formal contexts such as high schools. For example, Hoffman and Nadelson (2010) conclude that motivational engagement resulting from recreational gaming is unlikely to transfer to educational settings since classrooms are competitive and evaluative. They define motivational engagement as individuals’ conscious and willing approach toward a task to pursue a specific goal based on their interests, values, and affect. Accordingly, gamers play to fulfill recreational, social, and esteem needs without focusing much on knowledge improvement. The study investigated the effect of a commercial DVG on EFL students’ LLM. Results indicated a significant change in motivation over time. However, only the Watchers showed a significantly higher score than the Readers in the end. Accordingly, it is suggested that DVGs can enhance LLM in high schools. Furthermore, the present study found that motivational engagement experienced through DVGs will transfer to educational settings meaning that using a DVG in the classroom positively affects student motivation. Altogether, the following points can be highlighted. Firstly, some students had certain suggestions about which DVG(s) should have been used. Thus, it is suggested that student interest should be considered in DVG selection as far as being viable. This can be attributed to the unique feature of DVGs: students think they should have a say in DVG selection/use since they are familiar with them (many of them are gamers). Secondly, students should have the freedom whether to play or just watch the DVG (especially if only a single DVG is to be used) as some of them might not like the DVG itself but enjoy the comfortable environment and experience less anxiety, which seems to enhance LLM. Moreover, especially pertaining to the Iranian context, students seem to have liked the Watchers’ treatment better probably since it gave them the chance to selectively participate or remain passive learners. Thirdly, DVGs should be used as a complementary activity not a replacement for textbooks since excessively using them would divert the original purpose (Reinhardt & Sykes, 2012). Fourthly, although the Readers did not play the game, it seems that the change of atmosphere through watching DVG videos, reading a DVG story, and working on activities targeting that story as a team improved their LLM though not as much as the Players and Watchers.

Conclusion

We think that our work is useful both for us and for the guys who are addicted to computer games. We are now more carefully choose the game. I advise you to contact your parents for help in determining the quality of the game, the genre of the game, the content of the game. In order to effectively educate a child, it must be carried away. Such action and have a modern computer games in English. Such games are becoming increasingly popular. Very well, if the game is voiced by native speakers, then the player, in addition to a large vocabulary, will also master the correct pronunciation. Results showed a significant LLM increase throughout the study. However, only the Watchers showed a significantly higher mean than the Readers in the end. There was no other significant difference between the treatments. The results agree with previous studies in that the use of DVGs can increase LLM (e.g., Connolly et al., 2011; Wehner, Gump, & Downey, 2011). However, most of the previous studies used educational rather than commercial DVGs. The study also agrees with Cole and Vanderplank’s (2016) speculation that informal learning instruments such as DVGs could be beneficial to formal learning contexts by motivating the learners. This indication supports Tragant, Muñoz, and Spada’s (2016) finding that solely teacher-led instruction may not be the optimum practice. The increase in motivation could be attributed to higher outcomes observed among game learners, as reported by Ebrahimzadeh (2016, 2017). The results of the present study contradict those of Hanus and Fox (2015), who found less motivation among the students who underwent gamified instruction. The findings also differ from those of Hoffman and Nadelson (2010), who concluded that the DVGs’ motivational engagement could not be transferred to educational settings. It should be noted, however, that previous studies have mainly focused on educational DVGs, not commercial ones. On the contrary, the present study used a commercial DVG in which language learning was not the primary purpose. Since commercial DVGs tend to be richer in terms of aesthetic features (e.g., better graphics, audiovisual effects, compelling stories), they may have some advantage over educational DVGs when it comes to enhancing motivation. This notion, however, is in need of further investigation. Similarly to Hoffman and Nadelson (2010).

The study investigated the effect of a commercial DVG on EFL students’ LLM. Results indicated a significant change in motivation over time. However, only the Watchers showed a significantly higher score than the Readers in the end. Accordingly, it is suggested that DVGs can enhance LLM in high schools. Furthermore, the present study found that motivational engagement experienced through DVGs will transfer to educational settings meaning that using a DVG in the classroom positively affects student motivation. Altogether, the following points can be highlighted. Firstly, some students had certain suggestions about which DVG(s) should have been used. Thus, it is suggested that student interest should be considered in DVG selection as far as being viable. This can be attributed to the unique feature of DVGs: students think they should have a say in DVG selection/use since they are familiar with them (many of them are gamers). Secondly, students should have the freedom whether to play or just watch the DVG (especially if only a single DVG is to be used) as some of them might not like the DVG itself but enjoy the comfortable environment and experience less anxiety, which seems to enhance LLM. Moreover, especially pertaining to the Iranian context, students seem to have liked the Watchers’ treatment better probably since it gave them the chance to selectively participate or remain passive learners. Thirdly, DVGs should be used as a complementary activity not a replacement for textbooks since excessively using them would divert the original purpose (Reinhardt & Sykes, 2012). Fourthly, although the Readers did not play the game, it seems that the change of atmosphere through watching DVG videos, reading a DVG story, and working on activities targeting that story as a team improved their LLM though not as much as the Players and Watchers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                 References

  1. (2003). Warcraft III: The Frozen Throne [Computer software]. USA: Blizzard Entertainment.
    Retrieved from http://eu.blizzard.com/en-gb/games/war3/
  2. Bodnar, S., Cucchiarini, C., Strik, H., & Van Hout, R. (2016). Evaluating the motivational impact., Carreira, J. M. (2006). Motivation for learning English as a foreign language in Japanese elementary schools.
    Clark, R. C., & Mayer, R. E. (2011). E-Learning and the Science of Instruction Proven Guidelines for
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  3. Cohen, J. W. (1988). Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ:
  4. Collins, L., & Muñoz, C. (2016). The foreign language classroom: Current perspectives and future
  1. Connolly, T. M., Stansfield, M., & Hainey, T. (2011). An alternate reality game for language learning: Arguing for multilingual motivation. Computers & Education, 57(1), 1389-1415.

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